The 2-Step & 2-Minute Fix: Logitech G29 Knocking Noise

Got a Logitech G29 with a crazy knocking noise? I did too. Here’s the two main problems, and some quick fixes you can do right now to solve the problem!

The Logitech G29 wheel and pedal setup offers exceptional value for money.

Logitech bang on about the features on offer, and to be honest for a few hundred dollars, the package is a steal.

The one thing they don’t mention?

Every single Logitech G29 wheel (at least, on F1 2017 and Project Cars) has the most horrendous knocking noise of any PC/PS4 & XBOX wheel.

I found it unbearable, and you probably do too.

So, here are the two problems, and two ways to fix those problems right now.

Problem 1 – Force Feedback And Wheel Settings

I first played with the G29 on Project Cars. Since then, I only race F1 2017.

In both games I had the exact same problem.

The knocking wasn’t just an annoying noise.

At one point my wheel vibrated so much, it worked the mount loose and the wheel fell off it’s mounting surface during game play!!!

I have no idea why, but the G29s wheel settings are not in-sync with reality. They just don’t work.

The combination of force feedback, rumble strip and on-track effects means that out of the box, it even has a knocking noise on the straights!

Quick Fix: Force Feedback And Wheel Settings

The fix is similar for all racing games.

You need to jump into control schemes > advanced wheel settings > force feedback settings.

The actual FFB setting is the maximum feedback you’ll get from your wheel.

But to get rid of the knocking noise you’ll have to turn this down so low, you won’t get any feel from your wheel on-track.

So, you don’t want to do that.

A good base-line setup to work from is:

Force Feedback: 85

Rumblestrip Effects: 1

On-Track Effects: 0

Wheel Weight: 100

Wheel Rotation: 360

Understeer: On

Try that out.

Although 1 & 0 for track effects seems low, I can tell you now they’re still 10x more powerful than a controller.

As I said, the settings have no real correlation to the actual feel in the wheel.

So just ignore the numbers until you’ve tried it out for yourself.

Problem 2 – Hard Wheel Mount Contact Area

If you’re using a metal mounting surface as I do with my OpenWheeler you have contact between: 

  • Metal
  • The G29s rock-hard plastic mounts

Vibrations HAVE to go somewhere.

As there’s no “give” in either surface mentioned above, they come through the wheel.

So you’ve probably felt it “snap” out of your hands on occasion.

What Logitech and racing chair manufacturers SHOULD have done, is incorporated a softer contact patch for the mounting area on both the wheel, and racing chair.

I don’t run a racing chair or gaming wheel company, so I have no idea why they haven’t done this already.

Quick Fix: Hard Wheel Mount Contact Area

I’ve not actually seen this fix online before.

What you need is any type of non-slip material that has some “give” in it.

Thin rubber is made for the job, so something like a used bicycle inner tube (you can buy small sections of thin rubber online if you don’t have a tube).

You don’t want anything too thick as the wheel won’t mount properly.

Around 3mm or less is perfect.

  1. Cut a section large enough to cover the mounting surface
  2. Mount the wheel directly onto the rubber
  3. Job done.

So, now you have a material in between two hard surfaces that will absorb some of the vibrations.

That means you can turn up on-track effects and FFB wheel settings, to get a better feel from your wheel!

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What’s Next?

Among other things, I’m a PS4 & F1 nut. Need help with driver settings, car setups or driving without assists?

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Written by
Grant Draper

Grant's a motorcycle geek, outdoor enthusiast & confirmed racing nut. He road tests all the gear he buys, and then gives his feedback here on NoobNorm.

He also details any quick fixes he stumbles upon, whether that's to stop brakes on motorcycles sticking, or unusual noises coming from gaming wheels.

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Written by Grant Draper